Let's Talk About Wigs, Baby.

Wigs seem to be the holy grail for ladies with any significant degree of hair loss. In the waiting room people play the ‘is it, isn’t it’ game and people love (myself included) to be told that their wig really doesn’t look like a wig.  

Despite now owning two wigs, I am interested in why the idea of seeing a woman without hair is quite so frightening.  Women should do whatever the hell they like with their heads, hair or no hair.

If wearing a wig makes you feel good, go for it. If you prefer a scarf or turban, that's cool too.

If you feel there are more important things to worry about, then absolutely let it be.

Some women choose to wear wigs so that it’s less immediately obvious that they are having some form of treatment and if you choose a wig very similar to your own hairstyle it might help you to feel more like yourself.  I’ve heard some women say that they can't bear for people to see them without hair and so wear a wig all the time or even (if they can afford it) invest in a hair replacement system.  As someone still wearing makeup every day I completely understand always wanting to look your best but I take my hat (or should that be wig!) off to anyone that can wear a wig all the time.  

I’m happy with the ‘serious’ wig I settled on (the other one is pink) but I don’t find wearing one very comfortable. It's quite tight and it itches and the relief when you take it off is like taking your bra off as soon as you come through the door after a long day at work. Yesterday I took the wig off in the taxi home after treatment as I just needed freedom and air on my head.

Finding a decent wig was a bit of a challenge. The short ones I initially tried made me look like a cross between Deidre Barlow and Alma Baldwin - not winning in the hair department. Wigs are also expensive, particularly if you want one made of human hair. The one I have been wearing was cheap enough to be fully covered by an NHS prescription which was a bonus.

I have been surprised by how few women you see around the hospital or in general that choose not to cover their heads in some way. If covering your head makes you feel better, then that is fine but please don’t suffer in a hot itchy wig because the status quo suggests that being even slightly bald is shameful. It isn't.

I've been out several times now without covering my head (which has had the clipper treatment).  

Did I feel self-conscious? For the first half an hour, Yes. Did anyone around me seem to care? No. I even ate in a nice restaurant on a busy Saturday evening and they didn't sit me at the back or particularly even seem to notice. I don’t cover my head at home because I want to be comfortable (I generally have the heating cranked so I don’t need to cover my head to keep warm) and I really don't care if the postman is offended.

So at the moment at least, I am choosing to have my cake and eat it – sometimes I wear a turban, sometimes I wear the wig and sometimes I dare to bare.

It is with this sentiment that I think we should attempt to normalise hair loss. Only then can choices about how best to deal with hair loss be based solely upon personal preference.



I'm having a bit of a silver moment and have bought some new things online recently.
The silver back pack (Skinny Dip) is much more compatible with walking with a crutch which has been causing me handbag issues.

The silver brogues (asos) feel much smarter than trainers and go perfectly with my all-time favourite culottes from Zara (I recently bought a pair in black and polka dot).

I'm also loving my grey velvet turban (asos).



I'll confess to having neglected the blog a bit recently but do hope to be back on form soon. Thanks for staying on board.

I've got a few new makeup bits that aid getting ready quickly so I'll post about them next time if people are interested.

One last thing and a shameless plug - I am raising money for Brain Tumour Research alongside colleagues and we are taking part in Wear A Hat Day 2017. If you are able to support you can donate via my Just Giving Page. Thank you.